Skyrocketing Gasoline Prices And Political Ignorance

15 06 2008

Christina Martinez, who lives in Whittier and works at retailer Fred Segal in West Hollywood, spends about $80 a week on gasoline.  She told the Los Angeles Times, “It’s frustrating that even during election season I’m only thinking of politics in terms of who will get me lower gas prices.”

It’s frustrating for more reasons than you know, Christina.  First, it’s frustrating that you, like many Americans, don’t have the depth to understand that the President has very little to do with such things, but market forces do instead.  Second, that as you head into an election, you – again, like many Americans – toss more important questions aside (ones over which a President might actually have some influence.)

4 responses to “Skyrocketing Gasoline Prices And Political Ignorance”
15 06 2008
Jon-Paul Busoli (12:50:43) :

Really can you blame them Anthony? People are not concerned about the market forces at play when it comes to things that affect you so directly such as gasoline or food prices. They have a greater chance of creating market change throught government regulations and subsidies (not that I agree with these) that through appeals to industry.

This is especially true in places like California where driving is required as part of the daily routine.

Btw: friendfeed rocks as a way to keep up on posts like this.

15 06 2008
Anthony Citrano (12:55:54) :

I blame people for being stupid, yes. It’s what has gotten us into so many of the pinches we find ourselves in. And I blame them for deciding who to vote for based on who panders to them about gas prices, yes. It’d be one thing to decide based on a candidates energy ideas and energy policy… but the type of ignorance on display by people like this is very sad indeed.

15 06 2008
Jon-Paul Busoli (15:50:43) :

Really can you blame them Anthony? People are not concerned about the market forces at play when it comes to things that affect you so directly such as gasoline or food prices. They have a greater chance of creating market change throught government regulations and subsidies (not that I agree with these) that through appeals to industry.

This is especially true in places like California where driving is required as part of the daily routine.

Btw: friendfeed rocks as a way to keep up on posts like this.

15 06 2008
Anthony Citrano (15:55:54) :

I blame people for being stupid, yes. It's what has gotten us into so many of the pinches we find ourselves in. And I blame them for deciding who to vote for based on who panders to them about gas prices, yes. It'd be one thing to decide based on a candidates energy ideas and energy policy… but the type of ignorance on display by people like this is very sad indeed.

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