Tom Robbins On Psychedelics

“My life doesn’t revolve nor has it ever revolved, around psychedelics. They enhanced my life — psychedelics can enhance the life of any intelligent, courageous person, and they might even represent our last great hope for planetary survival — but they didn’t replace my life or become its central focus. Second, it shouldn’t be implied that the acid elves sell talent by the pound — or the microgram. The psychedelic drug doesn’t exist that can make a creative genius out of a hack or turn a neurotic weenie into a happy fully-conscious human being. You have to bring something to the table, and be willing to risk your belief systems. Some people want to go to heaven without dying.”

2 thoughts on “Tom Robbins On Psychedelics”

  1. Thanks! He also said,

    “The day I ingested 300 micrograms of pure Sandoz LSD was the most rewarding day of my life, the one day that I would not trade for any other. To try to explain why it was so transformative, so profound, it would take pages — and even then would likely strike the uninitiated as flapdoodle. I’ll just say this: On that fateful day, I experienced in a direct, first-hand, concrete and thoroughly rational way that 1) time really is relative, 2) every daisy in the field has an identity just as strong as my own and 3) what we smugly mistake for solid form in our ‘realistic’ world is actually some strange fluid dance of molecular wonder. How could knowledge like that, lucidly demonstrated, fail to alter a person’s life? By the time I encountered LSD, I’d already been exposed to Surrealism, post-Einsteinian physics and Asian philosophies, so the effect the experience had on my writing is difficult to gauge. Certainly, the psychedelic experience left me less rigid — emotionally, intellectually and spiritually. This flexibility has reinforced my disposition for detecting screwy humor and deep meaning — often simultaneously — in some rather unlikely sources.”

  2. Thanks! He also said,

    “The day I ingested 300 micrograms of pure Sandoz LSD was the most rewarding day of my life, the one day that I would not trade for any other. To try to explain why it was so transformative, so profound, it would take pages — and even then would likely strike the uninitiated as flapdoodle. I’ll just say this: On that fateful day, I experienced in a direct, first-hand, concrete and thoroughly rational way that 1) time really is relative, 2) every daisy in the field has an identity just as strong as my own and 3) what we smugly mistake for solid form in our ‘realistic’ world is actually some strange fluid dance of molecular wonder. How could knowledge like that, lucidly demonstrated, fail to alter a person’s life? By the time I encountered LSD, I’d already been exposed to Surrealism, post-Einsteinian physics and Asian philosophies, so the effect the experience had on my writing is difficult to gauge. Certainly, the psychedelic experience left me less rigid — emotionally, intellectually and spiritually. This flexibility has reinforced my disposition for detecting screwy humor and deep meaning — often simultaneously — in some rather unlikely sources.”

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